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Notes From A Hockey Mom: Marketing Your Team Junior Hockey News

Published: Friday, 26 Jun 2020  
By: Michelle Anderson, Behind the Champ


I’m going to be honest here.  Some teams out there already do a great job at this, but there are also a bunch who need some help.  I’m going to throw out a whole bunch of ideas for you here to help you get some butts in seats.  When you get a large group of people to do something together, you get the feeling like you’re all coming together for a common cause, and peer pressure can be a powerful thing to harness for good!

Theme nights:

Sure, many of you do a Pink the Rink for breast cancer, and maybe you do a teddy bear toss or a military appreciation night,or even a youth hockey night, but there are a bunch of other possibilities here:

Back to school night asking for donations of school supplies

A charity game against police, fire, or other first responders.  You could even run a costume contest for fans who dress up as superheroes.

Healthcare Professionals night, maybe coordinated with a blood drive or a limited edition scrub top available for purchase.  Or you could auction off special jerseys and donate the proceeds to the children’s hospital or another medical charity like Doctors Without Borders

“Socktober” where one game or weekend in October, fans donate new socks for the homeless or local family crisis center

Ladies night asking for donations of feminine products or diapers and baby wipes for the local women’s shelter

Ugly sweater night with special jerseys that could be auctioned off for charity.  You could have someone dress as Santa for pictures and for a skate with the team and Santa after the game

Food drive for the local food shelf

Toys for Tots night asking for donations of new, unwrapped toys (you heard their spiel in your head just now, didn’t you?)

Hawaiian shirt night, again with special jerseys that could be auctioned off for charity or call it beach night and give away promotional beach balls or leis.  You could have the concession stand put those little paper umbrellas in every beverage

Camouflage night where everyone wears camo.  Again, opportunity for special jerseys or limited edition merch.

Patriotic night where everyone wears red, white, and blue.  Again, opportunity for jerseys or merch

90s night where everyone dresses up in 90s attire.  You could have jerseys or merch with that classic paper cup graphic. Google it.  You’ll remember it when you see it.

I could go on forever with this, but think about things that are prominent in your community and incorporate those.  If rodeo is big in your area, have a cowboy/cowgirl night, for example.  If you have a large Hispanic community, maybe you have a Hispanic night and have a guest announcer speaking Spanish or a guest play by play announcer calling the game in Spanish.  Maybe you have a special food item at the concession stand that night.  

Theme nights and promotions like this give you something else to hype up on social media or on radio, TV, or newspaper ads.  You can partner with local businesses to sponsor these nights, and they can hand out coupons or a promotional item or samples. 

And speaking of social media, you can’t just post about the next game every day because that gets boring.  Mix it up with posts about your players, alumni, or staff.  You could do posts about team history--quiz your followers and draw a name for a couple free game tickets.  Post about main camp and pre-season training.  Post game highlights throughout the game as well as after. Post about the team’s community service. Post about birthdays.  Highlight your billet families.  Ask your fans questions and get them engaged.  With all of these things as well as the team’s community service efforts, you’ll have a solid social media marketing plan to get your team name out there to generate interest.  


Author: Michelle Anderson from Behind the Champ
Hello! I am a Minnesota hockey mom of 15 years with a son currently playing junior hockey. My son was 2 ½ when he saw his first hockey game, and he became obsessed with playing hockey himself. I thought, “He’s 2. It will pass.” It didn’t. I have to admit that I knew absolutely nothing about hockey when we first started this journey, but I learned quickly along the way thanks to all the other hockey parents out there. I also saw how much fun he was having so I joined a women’s league and learned how to play myself. The kids make it look a lot easier than it is, but it’s a beautiful game and tons of fun both to watch and to play, even badly in my case. I look forward to bringing you a hockey mom’s point of view to these shenanigans in the world of junior hockey.


* Disclaimer: This site may contain advice, opinions and statements from various authors and information providers. Views expressed in this article reflect the personal opinion of the author, Michelle Anderson, and not necessarily the views of JuniorHockey.com. JuniorHockey.com does not represent or endorse the accuracy or reliability of any advice, opinion, statement or other info provided in the article, or from any other member of this site.
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